Category: Research

Analysis of Physiotherapy through Art History

We are well accustomed to photographs of World War I physiotherapy wards. Busy rooms, filled with rehabilitating soldiers offer a glimpse into a past world and the beginnings of a new profession. In contrast, a painting of the very same scene offers far greater insight, as we get to see what

Plaster of Paris

Immobilisation of injured limbs has been performed for thousands of years and starch-based casts were the standard treatment, with only minor changes, until the beginning of the 19th century. Many centuries before it was introduced as a cast material, Plaster of Paris (PoP)* was well known as a building material. Egyptians

Origins of the Bad Ragaz Ring Method

The waters of Bad (Bath) Ragaz, Switzerland enjoy a long history of healing, which began in 1240 when hunters from the local monastery discovered an extraordinary warm thermal spring in the Tamina Gorge, close to the nearby Mountain town of Pfäfers. Bathing activities started soon afterwards by drilling bathtubs into

The wonders of the Wellcome Archive

There are many wondrous things to be found at the Wellcome Library in London (link). Some years ago I spend a very happy month at the Wellcome researching the archives of the CSP for my doctorate, and a few days ago I stumbled across a file of photos I’d taken

Sir Charles Strong applying a low frequency current

A royal history of animal physiotherapy

‘’As humans respond so rapidly to this form of treatment for their injuries, why isn’t it used on horses for theirs?’’ Lord Luis Mountbatten to Sir Charles Strong (1939) Many will know of Lord Luis Mountbatten, a great british sailor, a notable diplomat, and the last Viceroy of India. Many

The first self-propelled wheelchair built by German paraplegic, Stephan Farffler

History of the Wheelchair

The 1st of March is International Wheelchair Day so we are getting ready for the celebrations by having a look back at the history of the wheelchair. While both chairs and wheels have been around of thousands of years, the Ancient Greeks and the Chinese were the first to combine

View Gallery

François Humbert – a pioneer of 19th century orthopaedics

Last week I had a series of email conversations with Axelle Mokry (www.senselab.ch), a Swiss physiotherapist who has for some time now been part of an association looking to research the work of French doctor François Humbert, who created the first orthopedic centre of France in 1817.   Unlike many academics

Hilda Harris – an Australian pioneer

Hilda Harris commenced as a first-year student at the University of Sydney in 1916. She joined fifty-one students in that year. During the First World War the then Australasian Massage Association, (the association that later and appropriately changed its name to the Australian Physiotherapy Association), with the Universities of Melbourne,

Prue Galle receiving a WCPT International Service Award from Past President Marilyn Moffat.

The Primary Contact Physiotherapist

In 1976 the Australian Journal of Physiotherapy published an article by Prue Galley titled ‘Patient referral and the physiotherapist’. This article was a synthesis of the debates and arguments about whether Australian physiotherapists were ready to act as primary contact professionals. Galley asked: Have we as physiotherapists, the knowledge, the

View Gallery

Símbolos da Fisioterapia: Os antigos e o novo.

Symbols of Physiotherapy: The old and the new.   A história da Fisioterapia também é representada por meio de símbolos. Os símbolos, pela sua natureza, evocam num determinado contexto algo abstrato ou distante. No caso da Fisioterapia brasileira vários símbolos foram utilizados, sofrendo modificações ao longo do tempo, evoluindo sempre, até

Translate »