All posts by Dave Nicholls

Dr. Nicholls is an Associate Professor in the School of Public Health and Psychosocial Studies, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand. He is a physiotherapist, lecturer, researcher and writer, with a passion for critical thinking in and around the physical therapies. David is the founder of the Critical Physiotherapy Network, an organisation that promotes the use of cultural studies, education, history, philosophy, sociology, and a range of other disciplines in the study of the profession’s past, present and future. David’s own research work focuses on the critical history of physiotherapy and considers how physiotherapy might need to adapt to the changing economy of health care in the 21st century. He has published 35 peer-reviewed articles and 17 book chapters, many as first author. He is also very active on social media, writing more than 500 blogposts for criticalphysio.net in the last three years. David has taught in physiotherapy programmes in the UK and New Zealand for over 25 years and has presented his work all around the world. The End of Physiotherapy – the first book-length critical history of physiotherapy, and written by David – was published by Routledge in mid-2017.

The Stoke Mandeville bed cycle

This post was written by Selina Hurley, Curator of Medicine, at the Science Museum in London Now on display in Medicine: The Wellcome Galleries, this bed cycle helps tell the story of Ludwig Guttmann (1899-1980), German neurologist, who was part of a movement to change the treatment of people with

The IPHA in 2020

Last week we had the first meeting of the IPHA Executive for 2020. Over the course of the next few weeks you’re going to be able to read about some of the work we’re doing, as each of the Exec members post about work they’re involved in. Perhaps the most

A

A short history of scope of practice changes in British Columbia, Canada

The Physiotherapy History of British Columbia Project group in Canada recently had a discussion about the changing scope of physiotherapy practice in BC. These notes were prepared by Nancy Cho and Patricia Grohne. It would be interesting to see how these changes compare with what you have seen in your

A history of Spanish physiotherapy

In 2011the Spanish physiotherapy journal Cuestiones de Fisioterapia ran a special issue on the history of physiotherapy in Spain (link to full pdf of the journal). Very generously, the authors included English translations of many of the abstracts. Thanks to Glenn also for translating a version of the editorial through Google

Recognising 200 years of international orthopaedic manipulative physical therapy

Following on from last week’s post on Kay Nias’s presentation on the history of massage, this week we have a pdf of some of Cameron MacDonald’s work on the history of orthopaedic manipulative physical therapy. For more information, contact Cameron here. Recognizing 200 years of International OMPT Practice pdf

Massage and the history of physiotherapy

A few days ago, Kay Nias, Medicine Galleries Research Fellow at the Science Museum in London, gave a talk on massage and the history of physiotherapy (link).  Kay was kind enough to share her slides with us and the text of her talk (see below).  You can find more of

View Gallery

IFOMT 1977

The proceedings of the 3rd international seminar of the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapy make for fascinating reading. Just over 40 years ago now, the meeting held in Vail, Colorado from May 30th to June 3rd brought together some now well known practitioners from around the world. Given the

The first ever special issue on the history of physiotherapy moves closer

Last year we began work on the first ever special issue Physiotherapy Theory and Practice dedicated to the history of physiotherapy, and today the project moved a step closer. All eight draft papers were sent off for peer review today, and we’re posting all of the draft abstracts here so

View Gallery
M

Mystery Physiotherapy History

Those of you older than, say, 50, should have no trouble identifying these.  So do you know what they are and what we did with them?

Exercise in the 16th Century

In De Arte Gymnastica, written in 1569, Hieronymus Mercurialis describes six exercise principles: Each exercise should preserve the existing health state Exercises should be suited to each part of the body All healthy people should exercise regularly Sick people should not be given exercises that might exacerbate existing conditions Special

Translate »