Tag: history

Kay Nias

I had the great pleasure of spending an hour in conversation with Dr Kay Nias this morning. Kay is a Medicine Galleries Research Fellow at the Science Museum specializing in the history of physiotherapy, and has recently posted a beautifully illustrated and written piece on the history of the wheelchair

Gym machines and gynaecological massage

Many of you will know of the pioneering work of Anders Ottosson, whose histories of mobilization, kinesiology and the gendered basis of physiotherapy history were some of the first critical scholarship to be published in the field.   Well, Anders along with Michaela Malmberg have published two chapters in a

The oral history of physiotherapy in the UK

Last week we finally got the chance to talk to Barbara Richardson about the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy’s Oral History Project that she led. You can find more information on the project here. The audio quality of the Skype call was a little patchy, but in this interview, we talk

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) Retirement Association Oral History Project

One of the main functions of the IPHA is to be a conduit or link to the various physiotherapy history projects, writings, presentations and events going on around the world. To that end, we’re very pleased to be able to point readers to some resources produced by Barbara Richardson and

The history of work

Work

Physiotherapy is inextricably linked to work; to returning people back to productive labour or meaningful activities.  As an important cog in the health services of many countries around the world, physical therapies have proven a powerful and effective way to rehabilitate people who have been ill and injured and maintain their

Physiotherapy history as a tool to identify the ‘soul’ of the profession

“Critique needs friction or a kind of dialogue. Existing reality must be confronted with strangeness and the historically different can assume the function of this counterpart, meaning present and past must continuously be set in relation to each other”. This quote comes from a recent paper by Thomas Foth, Jette Lange and

New book: The Oxford Handbook of Disability History

The Oxford Handbook of Disability History (link) Michael Rembis, Catherine J. Kudlick, and Kim Nielsen, eds. Table of contents Part I. CONCEPTS AND QUESTIONS 1. The Perils and Promises of Disability Biography – Kim E. Nielsen 2. Disability History and Greco-Roman Antiquity – C.F. Goodey and M. Lynn Rose 3. Intellectual Disability

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