The wonders of the Wellcome Archive

There are many wondrous things to be found at the Wellcome Library in London (link).

Some years ago I spend a very happy month at the Wellcome researching the archives of the CSP for my doctorate, and a few days ago I stumbled across a file of photos I’d taken from the archives.

These are images of Dame Rosalind Paget’s original rough notes on forming the first physiotherapy exams for the Incorporated Society of Trained Masseuses between 1907 and 1913 [SA/CSP/P.2/3/2].

Dame Paget was one of the founders of the Society of Trained Masseuses and came from a very influential family of politicians and suffragettes.  As well as helping establish the physiotherapy profession in England, she was also a pioneer of midwifery registration.

Note the brutal librarian’s comment on the folder of the final image.

            

Posted by Dave Nicholls

Dr. Nicholls is an Associate Professor in the School of Public Health and Psychosocial Studies, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand. He is a physiotherapist, lecturer, researcher and writer, with a passion for critical thinking in and around the physical therapies. David is the founder of the Critical Physiotherapy Network, an organisation that promotes the use of cultural studies, education, history, philosophy, sociology, and a range of other disciplines in the study of the profession’s past, present and future. David’s own research work focuses on the critical history of physiotherapy and considers how physiotherapy might need to adapt to the changing economy of health care in the 21st century. He has published 35 peer-reviewed articles and 17 book chapters, many as first author. He is also very active on social media, writing more than 500 blogposts for criticalphysio.net in the last three years. David has taught in physiotherapy programmes in the UK and New Zealand for over 25 years and has presented his work all around the world. The End of Physiotherapy – the first book-length critical history of physiotherapy, and written by David – was published by Routledge in mid-2017.

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